Residents displaced after late-night apartment fire

South Creek Apartments fire ruled accidental; 18 units uninhabitable

Posted 10/24/18

A late-night fire at South Creek Apartments, at 5891 South Nevada Street, just north of Arapahoe Community College, left all 18 units uninhabitable and all residents displaced on Oct. 24. No injuries …

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Residents displaced after late-night apartment fire

South Creek Apartments fire ruled accidental; 18 units uninhabitable

Posted

A late-night fire at South Creek Apartments, at 5891 South Nevada Street, just north of Arapahoe Community College, left all 18 units uninhabitable and all residents displaced on Oct. 24. No injuries were reported.

The fire started just before 11 p.m. on Oct. 23, according to a press release from the City of Littleton. More than a dozen firefighting vehicles and 45 firefighters responded, and firefighters worked with Littleton police officers to evacuate the building. The cause of the fire was accidental, according to the press release.

Red Cross volunteers helped several families, according to a Twitter post, offering emergency assistance and support. A Red Cross spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Crews were busy boarding up the building on the morning of Oct. 24.

Cindy Grover, who said she lives on the first floor of the building with her mother — who suffers from Alzheimer's disease — said she was told she won't be allowed back into her apartment for at least a week.

“My whole life is in there,” Grover said, gesturing to her boarded-up apartment.

Firefighters went into the apartment and retrieved her mother's medications and dentures, but she wasn't able to get her mother's wheelchair, Grover said.

Grover said she will likely stay with family for the time being. She said management has been responsive.

A woman who identified herself as an employee of the apartment's management company, but would not give her name, then told Grover to stop speaking to the Independent, and said management had no comment.

The complex's management has been very helpful, said Nathan Reynolds, who lives on the second floor. 

"They've been on the phone with me all morning, and they even went in to get my wallet and my wife's phone," Reynolds said by phone. 

One of Reynolds' two cats was still in the apartment as of noon on Oct. 24, he said, adding that management was working to retrieve it. His other cat was taken to a shelter during the evacuation. 

Reynolds said the Red Cross offered hotel vouchers to residents, and management told him they were working on finding accommodations for displaced residents. 

The apartment complex offers federally subsidized rent to low-income earners, Reynolds said. He pays $1,000 a month for a three-bedroom apartment he shares with his wife and two children.

The apartments are owned by Todd Jaycox, according to state documents. Jaycox, the managing principal of Skyline Real Estate Investments, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

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