City manager candidates give their pitch to residents

Englewood council expected to choose official on June 24

Posted 6/11/19

Englewood has been without a city manager since last October, but the city has recently taken big steps toward naming a new one. Dozens of residents gathered inside Englewood Civic Center on June 3 …

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City manager candidates give their pitch to residents

Englewood council expected to choose official on June 24

Posted

Englewood has been without a city manager since last October, but the city has recently taken big steps toward naming a new one.

Dozens of residents gathered inside Englewood Civic Center on June 3 to speak with and listen to the three final city manager candidates, C. Scott Andrews, James (Shawn) Lewis and Andrew S. Lichterman. Englewood City Council will appoint a new city manager on June 24.

What candidates had to say

Andrews primarily talked to residents about his work history. He is currently the assistant city administrator for Smyrna, Georgia, a city with a population of 57,000 people. He said one of his passions is economic development and talked about how he has an appreciation for Englewood’s staff and residents.

“Any differences I see in the community is how to get from point A to point B. I think that’s one of my strengths,” said Andrews. “Clear, continuous communication is something I think I can do, and here, the opportunities that face Englewood are also my strengths.”

Lewis said he had an amazing experience learning more about the community. In his 20 years of experience in city government elsewhere, Lewis has learned that any Englewood employee can end up being the city’s most important one at any time. Lewis currently works as the assistant city manager in Longmont.

“Sometimes you have a push-pull between people that have been here for their whole lives. Their families have been here, but you also have newcomers that are wanting everything to change,” said Lewis. “I’ve worked really hard throughout my career to balance those sometimes competing priorities, and I want to help to do that here in Englewood.”

Lichterman shared a personal story about his ties to Englewood. His mother came to the city from Belize. He said he knows Englewood to be a welcoming, inclusive community, and he sees working as city manager as an opportunity to give back to the city. Lichterman said he’s dealt with crisis management as well as complex municipal issues.

“I’m attracted to this level of public engagement. It shows that the community cares,” said Lichterman, who works as assistant village manager in Deerfield, Illinois. “That’s a community that I want to be part of, that’s a community I want to live in, raise my family in and be the city manager of for the next 30 years.”

Why the city needs new manager

Former Englewood City Manager Erick Keck announced his resignation during a council meeting last September. He said there were a “divisive” final few months in his position, but added that his decision was influenced by his family. Dorothy Hargrove, whose regular position is director of parks, recreation and library, is filling in as interim city manager.

When Keck resigned, there was a recall movement underway to remove Englewood Councilmember Laurett Barrentine from her position. She was charged with harassment and disorderly conduct, stemming from an incident that took place last summer after a council study session. Charges were dropped in April, and residents voted to keep her in her position last September.

Last summer, some residential frustration grew when a woman was killed from a flood last July. Englewood admitted it wasn’t prepared for the flood, and its drain system was built in the 1950s to the 1970s.

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