Englewood clearing homeless camps on South Platte River

Residents receive notifications that they must leave area

Posted 6/3/19

The closest thing an Englewood man, who declined to give his name because he doesn't want it in the media, has had to a home since he was 13 is prison. When he got out of prison in 2013, he moved …

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Englewood clearing homeless camps on South Platte River

Residents receive notifications that they must leave area

Posted

The closest thing an Englewood man, who declined to give his name because he doesn't want it in the media, has had to a home since he was 13 is prison. When he got out of prison in 2013, he moved from place to place around the Denver metro area until he settled down to camp along the South Platte River at West Dartmouth Avenue and South Platte River Drive.

“All it takes is one missed paycheck, or one time not being able to pay rent, and then you're out here, and it all falls apart,” said the man.

The man is one of the homeless people along the South Platte River who were scheduled to start moving from the area on June 4.

Englewood police notified people on May 21 via signs and fliers on at homeless encampments along the banks of the Platte that they had until June 4 to leave the area. Around 25 camps were notified, and a good majority of them were occupied. The site is a public nuisance, according to the Englewood Municipal Code, and the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District began reseeding the river bank. The drainage district identified the site as a flood control and erosion mitigation area, according to a news release from Englewood police.

Englewood Police Chief John Collins said the encampment created issue with public health and safety. Last month, police responded to a stabbing that involved two homeless men.

“For the welfare of the public and of the individuals residing at the camp, it's simply become a dangerous situation that can't be ignored,” Collins said in the news release.

Change the Trend, a group who works to mobilize and equip Englewood, Littleton and Sheridan to engage homelessness issues, assisted those at the encampment by providing information about food, shelters, medical care and other resources. AllHealth Network provided behavioral health services.

“It seems like Englewood (took) some of the right steps by providing notice and connecting people with services," said Cathy Alderman, a spokesperson for the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless. "That's a critical part when you break up encampments."

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