Englewood High graduates a proud class

Students highlight diversity at commencement

Posted 5/20/19

With a graduating class of a little more than 70 students, Englewood High is a small school, especially in the middle of the Denver metro area — but its pride showed at its 2019 graduation …

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Englewood High graduates a proud class

Students highlight diversity at commencement

Posted

With a graduating class of a little more than 70 students, Englewood High is a small school, especially in the middle of the Denver metro area — but its pride showed at its 2019 graduation ceremony.

“In the words of one of our coaches, we are no longer Englewood — we are Englewood,” student Thomas O'Connor said with emphasis, to laughs from the audience.

O'Connor highlighted the school's recent athletic accomplishments, but speakers also pointed to the class boasting a Boettcher scholarship winner and a high score on an Advanced Placement exam. EHS held its graduation ceremony May 18 in the school's gymnasium.

EHS principal Ryan West mentioned the class' high attendance rate as among the reasons to celebrate the students.

“When I think of the class of 2019, I think of a class of leaders,” West said.

And students showed off their musical ability, too, performing a few songs that ran the gamut from Bruno Mars to Frank Sinatra.

Diversity proved to be a celebrated characteristic of EHS during the ceremony.

Fernando Jose Urrutia Zamora, a co-valedictorian, said he overcame not knowing how to speak English and having his family watch his accomplishments through long-distance video calls.

“I didn't speak the language, but I still needed to go to school,” Urrutia Zamora told the audience. “My path, like yours, was a difficult one.”

Dylan Carpenter, the other co-valedictorian, talked about the openness that defines EHS for him.

“We emphasize our differences rather than suffocate them in conformity,” Carpenter said.

Carpenter asked students to promise him that no matter where they go, they'll always remember “the small-town school” they came from.

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