Englewood

Family of boy who died sues Swedish

10-year-old Isaiah Bird died of respiratory arrest two years ago

Posted 12/22/16

The family of a 10-year-old boy who died less than an hour after being discharged from the Swedish Medical Center emergency room two years ago has filed a lawsuit against the hospital, as well as a doctor and a nurse at the hospital.

Isaiah Bird …

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Englewood

Family of boy who died sues Swedish

10-year-old Isaiah Bird died of respiratory arrest two years ago

Posted

The family of a 10-year-old boy who died less than an hour after being discharged from the Swedish Medical Center emergency room two years ago has filed a lawsuit against the hospital, as well as a doctor and a nurse at the hospital.

Isaiah Bird went into respiratory arrest in a Walgreens on Dec. 23, 2014. A lawsuit, filed in Arapahoe County District Court on behalf of his family by attorney David Woodruff, alleges that Isaiah had been prematurely discharged from the ER. Earlier in the day, the boy tested positive for influenza at his pediatrician's office and had failed to respond to breathing treatments.

“It's an unspeakable tragedy that never should have happened,” Woodruff said in a statement.

According to Steve Caulk, a spokesman for Woodruff's law firm, Isaiah was noted at the hospital to have a fever, elevated heart rate and audible and visible breathing difficulty. His father, Troy Bird of Littleton, had taken him to the ER, and then to the Walgreens afterward to fill his prescription.

Isaiah suffered brain damage from lack of oxygen and was removed from life support the next day, Christmas Eve. According to the lawsuit, an autopsy determined that he had pneumonia and an upper-airway infection.

"Swedish Medical Center is aware of the lawsuit that was filed today, though we are surprised by many of the accusations. Our hearts go out to the family, it is never easy to lose a loved one and no doubt this is a particularly difficult time of year," said Nicole Williams, assistant vice president of marketing and public relations for Swedish.

Woodruff, who specializes in medical malpractice suits, said Isaiah's condition was treatable but he was misdiagnosed.

Swedish Medical Center, emergency room , Isaiah Bird , Kyle Harding

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