'Flying Saucer Bank' is subject of talks

Englewood landmark was designed in 1965

Posted 3/20/16

The Englewood Historic Preservation Society will meet on March 28 to hear preservation consultant Diane Wray Tomasso speak about “The Flying Saucer Bank and the Communist in the Post Office.” There will be two presentations: 2:30 p.m. at the …

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'Flying Saucer Bank' is subject of talks

Englewood landmark was designed in 1965

Posted

The Englewood Historic Preservation Society will meet on March 28 to hear preservation consultant Diane Wray Tomasso speak about “The Flying Saucer Bank and the Communist in the Post Office.” There will be two presentations: 2:30 p.m. at the Englewood Library, inside the Englewood Civic Center at 1000 Englewood Parkway, and 6:30 p.m. at The Brew on Broadway, 3445 S. Broadway, in a renovated 1920s grocery store a block north of the “Flying Saucer Bank.”

In 1965, Colorado architect Charles Deaton, designer of the Sculpture House on Genesee Mountain, (aka the Sleeper House because of its appearance in Woody Allen's 1973 film “Sleeper,) was commissioned to design a new bank on South Broadway in Englewood for Key Savings and Loan.

With an address of 3501 S. Broadway, it is now owned by Community Banks of Colorado and is highly visible to the stream of motorists who drive by it every day — gleaming white, perhaps almost ready to fly away and described as the “Flying Saucer Bank” by many.

It was completed in 1967, a dome-like, rounded, organic-looking structure that is closely related to the Sculpture House Deaton had designed for his family. A curving glass wall faces the parking lot and it retains its original interior details.

Diane Tomasso, who got the old Englewood Post Office on Broadway listed as a designated historic site, has recently filed a request with the State of Colorado's Landmark Commission to also designate the “Flying Saucer Bank” as a historic site.

It fits several requirements: age, architectural distinction and relation to a significant architect.

Tomasso said it will be several months before the state commission rules on it. When that happens, a request can go for National Designation.

Englewood does not have an ordinance that allows for local designation at this point, although we have heard of some interest among residents of Arapahoe Acres, which is a National Historic Neighborhood. (Local designation can offer more protection from inappropriate design changes to a structure.)

If you go

Diane Wray Tomasso will speak about “The Flying Saucer Bank and the Communist in the Post Office” on March 28 — first at 2:30 p.m. at Englewood Library, 1000 Englewood Parkway, and then at 6:30 p.m. at BoB, The Brew on Broadway, 3445 S. Broadway. Admission is free and all are welcome. 720-254-1897, historicenglewood.org for more information.

Englewood Historic Preservation Society, Diane Wray Tomasso, Charles Deaton, flying saucer bank

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