New Englewood graduation rates show strong growth

EHS number soars upward; Colorado's Finest continues to rise

Posted 1/28/19

Englewood High School leaped forward so much it covered its losses from last year and then some, posting an 11 percentage-point gain in its graduation rate in just one school year, according to …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

New Englewood graduation rates show strong growth

EHS number soars upward; Colorado's Finest continues to rise

Posted

Englewood High School leaped forward so much it covered its losses from last year and then some, posting an 11 percentage-point gain in its graduation rate in just one school year, according to numbers from the Colorado Department of Education.

Colorado's Finest High School of Choice also showed improvement, putting up a 2 percentage-point gain that continued its trend of growth over the last nine years.

“This is very encouraging news for our community and a testament to the work of our students, teachers and school leaders,” said Wendy Rubin, superintendent for Englewood Schools, in a news release. “Nevertheless, our work is never finished, and we need to make sure that the number of our graduates continues to climb."

EHS' four-year graduation rate clocked in at 80.2 percent for the 2017-18 school year, putting it nearly on par with the state's average four-year rate, 80.7 percent. It's a large turnaround from the previous school year, when EHS' rate of 68.8 percent represented a nearly 7 percentage-point drop from the 2015-16 school year.

After some teeter-tottering over the years, EHS has broken the 80 percent mark for the first time since the state education department began measuring graduation rates differently in 2009-10. That was the first year the count focused on how many students graduate within four years, putting early and late graduates in different categories.

Colorado's Finest mostly serves students defined by the state Education Department as at high risk of dropping out due to various personal life obstacles or factors, or who are older than the traditional age for their grade level and are behind on credit hours. It also includes students who have an individualized education program (IEP) based on a disability or emotional challenges, as well as some students who fall outside all of these groups.

Colorado's Finest saw its four-year graduation rate rise from 28.8 percent last year to just above 31 percent in 2018. The school has more than doubled its graduation rate since 2010, when it came in at 12.8 percent.

Many students at Finest take on designed graduation plans that include concurrent enrollment in college-level classes, career and technical education (CTE) and certificate pathways, according to the release from the school district.

“Five-, six- and seven-year completion rates are particularly noteworthy for (Finest) due to the alternative pathways students take to graduate, often in more than four years' time,” the release said.

Finest's five-year graduation rate for 2018 is 36.9 percent, it added.

“We are committed to giving all of our students the support they need to graduate,” Rubin said in the release. “The high-interest programs and opportunities we have in place at both of our high schools — such as career and technical education and concurrent-enrollment college courses — make students excited about being at school and about their futures.”

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.