Study focuses on flooding issues in Englewood

Infrastructure projects that would mitigate risk could cost tens of millions

Posted 6/28/19

Last August, former Englewood City Manager Eric Keck acknowledged that the city was “caught flat-footed” when flooding in late July affected at least 25 housing units and left one woman dead. The …

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Study focuses on flooding issues in Englewood

Infrastructure projects that would mitigate risk could cost tens of millions

Posted

Last August, former Englewood City Manager Eric Keck acknowledged that the city was “caught flat-footed” when flooding in late July affected at least 25 housing units and left one woman dead.

The city was forced to take a look at its storm-drainage system — a system that was built during the 1950s to the 1970s, and Englewood's Department of Public Works is soliciting input from a Flood Prone Areas Storm Water Analysis and Alternatives Feasibility study to present to the city council on July 8. The study revealed where storm water is going and how it impacts residential property.

With the Flood Prone Areas Storm Water Analysis and Alternatives Feasibility study comes an interactive map where residents can see areas most susceptible to flooding. The map can be found at https://bit.ly/2KIibdA.

One area the study found that is prone to flooding is the 4600 blocks of South Acoma and Bannock streets — the area where the woman died.

“When it rains there, those people — they're frightened and rightfully so,” said Englewood Mayor Pro Tem Rita Russell. She says she received phone calls from residents in the area who are paranoid they are going to have their homes flooded every time it rains. Russell believes it's imperative to deal with flooding in the 4600 blocks of South Acoma and Bannock streets.

Maria D'Andrea, director of public works for Englewood, said capital projects for pipe and detnetion improvements in the city can cost anywhere from $37 million to $75 million.

“If council wants to move forward (with floodproofing projects) we'll look at some sort of rate increase in order to get the funds,” said D'Andrea. One possibility is raising stormwater fees for each property in the city. If a property owner were to flood proof their private property, the city may consider reinbursing properties, depending on what Council decides to do.

There is "potential" for a detention area project at open fields at Colorado's Finest High School of Choice, if an agreement can be made with Englewood Schools, according to city documents.

“I know there were a lot of people who lost a lot of assets due to (last year's July storm),” said Gregory Murphy, founder of Calibre Engineering, a civil engineering base. Calibre Engineering carried out the Storm Water Analysis and Alternatives Feasibility study.

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